The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (1926)

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

title LODGER

By Marilyn Ferdinand

The touring show The Hitchcock 9—the nine surviving features from Alfred Hitchcock’s catalog of silent films restored by the British Film Institute—finally hit town this weekend. For those unfamiliar with the director’s formative years, The Hitchcock 9 will prove enlightening, as nearly all of the films represent comedy and melodrama rather than classic suspense. The one exception, and my favorite of Hitchcock’s silent output, is The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog. The film, based on the best-selling 1913 novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, establishes in one package all of Hitchcock’s major obsessions—the wrong man, blondes, voyeurism, and the threat of nature. The latter, more suggested by the subtitle Hitchcock tacked onto Belloc Lowndes title than an actual menace, nonetheless is used to great effect to veil the title character in mystery and menace.

lodger PDVD_020

The Lodger is based loosely on the exploits of Jack the Ripper, and Belloc Lowndes’ book was widely known and read when the film premiered (in fact, it’s still in print today). The key, therefore, to building suspense is to arouse fear in the audience that our heroine, vivacious blonde Daisy Bunting (June Tripp), is to become a victim of the man who has been slaughtering golden-haired women in a pattern that suggests Daisy’s street is the next to be hit.

lodgeravenger

First, though, one must fill their hearts with dread. A terrified woman looks up into the camera and screams in the night. Too late, as would-be rescuers find only her mangled corpse on an embankment and a note marked with a triangle and the scrawl of “The Avenger” claiming to have done the deed. A witness says she only saw a man with a scarf covering the lower half of his face. A music hall marquee blinks “To-nite. Golden Curls,” ironically taunting the audience that blondes will be murdered over the next 80 or so minutes to provide us with a guilty pleasure perhaps not unlike the killer’s.

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Daisy, a mannequin at a London atelier, returns home to her parents’ (Marie Ault and Arthur Chesney) boarding house, where her suitor, Detective Joe Chandler (Malcolm Keen), drops by to flirt with her and gossip about the Avenger case. The doorbell rings, and Mrs. Bunting goes to answer it. Enveloped in the fog and a heavy cloak, a pale man (Ivor Novello) stands before her carrying a small grip and wrapped up to his nose in a scarf. When asked to state his business, he raises a ghostly hand toward the “To Let” sign above the door. After being led upstairs to inspect the room, he pays a month’s rent and becomes the lodger. He asks that the various pictures of blonde-haired women be removed from the room, and when Mrs. Bunting sends Daisy up to help carry the pictures out, she and the lodger meet for the first time.

the-lodger-chess-scene-hitchcock

Novello’s acting in the opening scenes is very broad, emphasizing the lodger’s peculiarities and secretiveness, filling him with a torment that seems largely overdone. There’s no doubt that Hitchcock the control freak wanted this type of performance, which shows up one handicap of soundless pictures—the inability to use vocal inflection to inject subtly suspicious tones and phrases. He throws further suspicion on the lodger when Novello admires Daisy’s golden curls and locks away his grip, which looks like a doctor’s bag in direct reference to the theory that the Ripper was a physician skilled in using surgical tools. One night, when the lodger goes out at about the same time another woman is murdered, Mr. and Mrs. Bunting start developing their own suspicions and quake at the thought that the murderer is living under their roof and, as it turns out, romancing their daughter.

lodger PDVD_021

There’s nothing terribly subtle about The Lodger. Daisy is a flirt who keeps Chandler on a leash until she finds someone she deems better, and Chandler is an overbearing blowhard who would love it if the girlfriend-stealing lodger were the killer. When we get to the truth that the lodger is wealthy (of course) and lost his sister to The Avenger, we understand his fixations and sensitivities. His promise to his dying mother that he will bring The Avenger to justice has worn on his last nerve, which is better exemplified by Hitch’s trick photography—letting us peer through the ceiling to see him pacing in his room—than with the sunken-eye make-up and fragility Novello displays.

lodgerC

Nonetheless, the murder of one of the Golden Curls dancers (Eve Gray) shows Hitchcock at his suspenseful best. The Avenger has been a topic high on the list of the dancers for weeks. Gray’s character is no less wary than the other girls, but she is often met at the stage door by her boyfriend and feels safe in his company. One night, they have a quarrel, and she storms off without him, blinded by her anger to the danger she has just put herself in. The scene unspools like any fateful encounter, building from the stage door to a secluded square where Gray fumbles with the undone buckle of her shoe. The dreadful build-up and horrible end to this scene, perhaps the best of the film, reflects the economy with which Hitchcock can terrify an audience.

lodger PDVD_018

He also knows how to titillate the old-fashioned way. In what a modern viewer can only see as a precursor to the shower scene in Psycho (1960), Daisy prepares for a bath. We watch her strip off her garments one by one until Hitch cuts to the bathtub drain and Daisy’s toes wiggling in the water. The lodger has no peephole like Norman Bates’, but he listens at the door nonetheless, and we get to see Daisy in her all-together, though the rim of the bathtub obscures any flagrant nakedness. Norman would have killed her, but the lodger’s interest is amorous, not murderous. I was quite overwhelmed during a love scene between the two when Hitchcock practically climbed up Novello’s nose with a close-up that took up the entire screen; this is one time I can honestly say the effect—and what Hitch was going for is anyone’s guess—would not be the same watching a DVD at home.

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Hitchcock takes a dig at vigilante justice as well, when the lodger is arrested but breaks free, only to be chased by a mob and beaten as he hangs helplessly by his handcuffs from a wrought-iron fence he tried to climb. Carefully placed shadows make the lodger into a Christ figure, and Hitch would return to the court of public opinion with no less than a priest at the center of suspicion in I Confess (1953).

Hitchcock's The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog.

All’s well that ends well, as the lodger is saved by Chandler and his men when they get word that the real Avenger has been apprehended. Failing to give the audience a glimpse of the killer is not only anticlimactic, but also a cheat. We are at the movie because we have a certain bloodlust that needs slaking, but Hitch proves to be more the moralist than usual and scolds us for suspecting the wrong man. The disappointment that must have greeted this omission was not lost on the master, however. He would not make that mistake again.

Lodger fence

It was a treat to see this film with its restored color tints, and what looked like two-strip Technicolor in the penultimate scene of the mob chasing the lodger. The title cards, a clear homage to German Expressionism, must have been a delight for the director to work on, harkening back to his days of drawing them for other filmmakers. Finally, the live accompaniment of the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra was appropriate, elegant, and a huge asset to enjoying this classic from the silent screen. If you have the opportunity, make time to see some or all of The Hitchcock 9, and especially The Lodger.

  • michaelgsmith spoke:
    14th/08/2013 to 2:28 pm

    Great review. This is my favorite Hitch silent too and I have the magnificent BFI restoration on Blu-ray, which was released in the UK late last year.

    I’m glad you noted the striking close-ups in the kissing scene. THE LODGER contains so many Hitch “firsts” and I think first memorable kiss should be among them (prefiguring the great kissing scenes in NOTORIOUS, REAR WINDOW and VERTIGO).

  • Marilyn spoke:
    14th/08/2013 to 2:31 pm

    Thanks, Mike. I found that kissing scene almost alarming. His subsequent love scenes are demure by comparison.

  • Felix Gonzalez, Jr. spoke:
    15th/08/2013 to 7:52 pm

    Wonderful review, Marilyn. Another Hitchcock film in which the “kiss” would reappear is MARNIE, where, as you say, Hitchcock practically climbs up Tippi Hedren’s noses.

    One of the things I find most interesting about this film is that while it does feature what would become one of Hitchcock’s favorite themes, “the wrong man,” that was not really by Hitchcock’s own choice. The novel apparently ended with the lodger in fact being the killer, but because Novello was a romantic heartthrob at the time, the producers insisted he remain innocent so as not to damage his screen image (a fate that would also befall Cary Grant’s character in SUSPICION). It’s tantalizing to imagine what kind of suspenseful climax Hitch would have devised had he not been limited to this happy ending.

    I do have to admit, though, that I quite enjoy the very last appearance of the “To-nite Golden Curls” marquee in the closing shot, as it becomes something of a sexual double entendre as Daisy and Novello proceed (off screen) to consummate their romance.

  • Marilyn spoke:
    15th/08/2013 to 9:42 pm

    Hi Felix, and thanks! Honestly, I don’t remember that scene in MARNIE, but then I think I would need to see it in a theatre to get the impact that this showing of THE LODGER had.

    I did not know that the book ended differently, but I totally understand why the producers wanted to rescue Novello from being unlikeable. If Hitch had been faithful to the book we would have had PEEPING TOM, which I love but which ruined Michael Powell’s career for the very reasons Novello got to be innocent. Nonetheless, the wrong man theme probably appealed to Hitch more in this case.

    Thanks for stopping by.

  • NeveR spoke:
    8th/10/2013 to 9:44 am

    This is a fantastic movie and deserves to be more widely remembered than it is.

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