TOERIFC Returns April 6!

By Marilyn Ferdinand

Some of you may remember that Greg Ferrara, Rick Olson, and I started a film club a while back called The Oldest Established Really Important Film Club. It lasted for about a year, when life intruded on hobby and sent the club into limbo. Now, the energetic Adam Zanzie of Icebox Movies has shaken the wooly mammoth from its deep freeze. His discussion of Hall Bartlett’s 1973 adaptation of Richard Bach’s 1970 philosophical novella Jonathan Livingston Seagull begins tomorrow. You still have time to rent and watch the movie. I saw it last night, and think this film will generate some fascinating discussion on nature, religion, and the hippie ethos—and that’s just for starters. See you tomorrow at Icebox Movies!

  • Adam Zanzie spoke:
    5th/04/2011 to 1:16 pm

    Marilyn, thanks a million for promoting this! It will be swell to see the TOERIFIC band getting back together again.

  • Peter Nellhaus spoke:
    5th/04/2011 to 3:02 pm

    There’s also Hall Bartlett’s The Caretakers which I saw theatrically many, many years ago. It’s suppose to be about mental health treatment but it’s really about Joan Crawford letting the world know that she might not be an attractive young thing, but she still had great legs. Also on Netflix Instant.

  • Adam Zanzie spoke:
    5th/04/2011 to 3:23 pm

    The Caretakers is, eh… so-so. Crawford is excellent and so is Robert Stack, but that movie has something of a brain-damaged narrative; it’s Bartlett’s noble attempt at cinematic intellectualism in the wake of Zero Hour!, but not quite finding it in the right script.

    Interestingly enough, The Caretakers and JLSG were made 10 years apart. Shows how much he evolved in a decade of limbo.

  • Greg Ferrara spoke:
    6th/04/2011 to 9:55 am

    Some of you may remember that Greg Ferrara, Rick Olson, and I started a film club a while back called The Oldest Established Really Important Film Club

    Hmmmm… that does sound vaguely familiar. Good luck to Adam with the post and I hope it gets some good discussion. I’ve never seen the film actually. If I wasn’t currently in the middle of a “I have no desire to write anything or take part in anything ever again online” mood, I might have watched it.

    I’m glad Adam decided to revive TOERIFC rather than just put up the post unattached. Maybe he can get it going again.

  • Marilyn spoke:
    6th/04/2011 to 11:17 am

    I always wanted the club to continue, but didn’t think I could go it alone. (Rick, as you know, has disappeared.)

  • Greg Ferrara spoke:
    6th/04/2011 to 6:27 pm

    Last I saw he was the “Pin Cushion” man in the freak show. Oh, Rick, you’ve fallen so far.

  • Andrew spoke:
    7th/04/2011 to 3:15 pm

    I own JLS on VHS. When I was 5 years old I could recite the entire record narrated by Richard Harris. I also own a copy of the record. I also am a huge fan of the Neil Diamond soundtrack. Needless to say i’m a big fan of the film. The watered down pop spirituality of Bach aside, the film is a visual and auditory triumph of nature filming and I continue to be inspired by it today. In the end, I don’t think I’m capable of an objective critique because the film is so intensely resonant for me in a kind of Tarkovskian childhood memory way. Funny, how some films can actually become woven with your own childhood to become indistinguishable. I would also have to say that the Kung Fu TV Series was on during those years and was also my favorite TV Show. Similar impressions and dynamics there as well :)
    Looking forward to your essay on JLS

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